Past research students

Fredrick Omoarukhe obtained his BEng in Chemical Engineering from the University of Ilorin and is currently pursuing an MSc in Chemical Engineering at the University of Adelaide. His research interests are in the areas of hydrogen production, storage, and utilization, as well as renewable products and processes. Fredrick developed a stochastic economic model for evaluating the minimum fuel selling price of renewable propylene glycol. His publications can be found here Link.


Inioluwa Christianah Afolabi obtained her Bachelor's degree in the Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology. She is currently a doctoral student at the University of Cambridge under the Mastercard foundation scholarship. Her research interest is in the area of data-driven machine-learning applications for thermochemical process prediction and optimization. Her publications can be found here Link.

Meshach Tabat obtained his B.Eng in Chemical Engineering from the Federal University of Technology, Minna. He is currently a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Calgary, Alberta. His research interest is in the design of conceptual integrated biorefinery systems for the optimization of bioenergy systems. His publications can be found here Link.

Kwaghtaver S. Desongu is currently a graduate student at Auburn University. Before joining Auburn, he was a member of the CETG where he worked on underground hydrogen storage and (white) natural hydrogen. He obtained his bachelor's degree in Chemical Engineering from the Federal University of Technology, Minna. Desongu contributed significantly towards the success of the highly regarded review paper entitled "Perspectives and prospects of underground hydrogen storage and natural hydrogen".

Arnold Sison is currently a graduate student in Chemical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma. He is currently doing his honors thesis under the supervision of Professor Okolie. He is working on combining experimental data with mechanistic process simulation and interpretable machine learning to understand hydrogen production from chemical looping gasification of waste biomass. Find the link to Arnold's work below

Chinenye Douglas completed his masters degree on the application of interpretable machine learning to understand lignocellulosic biomass pyrolysis: catalyst screening and process optimization. The work was sponsored by the PTDF and DAAD scholarship. He is currently a software engineer and hope to continue applying his expertise to advance industrial decarbonization. Find the link to his thesis here.